KHive Defends Biden, Attacks Dr. Umar Johnson As Breakfast Club Interview Reaches 1M Views

KHive Defends Biden, Attacks Dr. Umar Johnson As Breakfast Club Interview Reaches 1M Views

KHive

KHive Defends Biden, Attacks Dr. Umar Johnson As Breakfast Club Interview Reaches 1M Views Photo: Kamala Harris, Aug. 19, 2020, (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)/YouTube screenshot /mmg

Black thought leader Dr. Umar Johnson stirred up the KHive when he said that Kamala Harris, whose mother was Indian, was selected as vice president to advance the U.S. government’s Asian agenda.

“The continent of Asia is a big problem for America,” Johnson said during an interview on The Breakfast Club. He singled out Russia, which he said “America can’t stand,” China, “which America can’t control,” and India, “which is one of the fastest-growing populations and is quickly becoming the IT giant of the world.”

“Kamala Harris is not vice president by accident,” Johnson insisted. “She is vice president on purpose because America needed to send an olive branch to India.”

Johnson also called out President Joe Biden for not doing enough for Black Americans. The controversial interview has now surpassed 1 million views online.

“The Asia agenda is a distraction to the issues affecting Black people,” Johnson said.

According to Dr. Johnson, Biden has gone out of his way to protect the rights of other groups but not Black people. He cited the Senate’s recent passage of an anti-Asian hate crime bill and the Biden executive order to protect transgender people and others based on gender identity or sexual orientation.

Now Johnson is being attacked by the KHive, an online community that supports Harris and doesn’t seem to like his comments about Harris or Biden.

“Dr. Umar Johnson is purposely misleading black people in regards to What Joe Biden & Kamala Harris have actually donesince they took office. He’s counting on your inability to fact check & understand how government works to stop you from getting politically involved,” 2RawTooReal tweeted. “Remember when they said Barack Obama didn’t do anything for black people this is the same exact tactic.”

But others posted support for Johnson. “Umar addressed the elephant in the room on the breakfast club…” @wealth__forever tweeted.

The KHive, launched when Harris was a California senator, became prominent when she was a presidential contender. It is known for being not only protective of Harris but also for being vicious. 

“The KHive aims to amplify and support the Democratic vice presidential nominee, but some of its members have crossed the line from ardent fandom to overt harassment,” The Huffington Post reported in early 2020.

The KHive has been accused of spewing slurs about people’s ethnicity and sexuality, including calling Black people “house slaves” for backing other Democrats. There have been reports of the KHive harassing gay people.

Before the 2020 presidential election, KHivers were said to comprise up to 50,000 to 60,000 Twitter accounts.

The term “KHive” was formally branded by MSNBC pundits such as Joy Reid. Private citizen Bianca Delarosa is said to have organized Harris supporters in a Facebook group in 2017, according to Vox.

After that, “Democratic Party-connected Twitter bots helped drive KHive,” The Gray Zone reported. The KHive was found to have several fake and suspicious accounts. KHive members such as Delarosa created several accounts, which violates Twitter’s rules. Yet the KHive has survived.

“In fact, KHive uses the very same tactics that Twitter banned Q-Anon accounts for using. Yet still to this day, KHive proudly admits to circumventing suspensions as far back as 2015, and remains on Twitter,” The Gray Zone reported.

https://twitter.com/JeromeW92688/status/1387137194066956293?s=20

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