fbpx

Majority Of Milwaukee Coronavirus Cases Are Middle-Aged African- American Men Who May Have Thought They Weren’t At Risk, Officials Say

Majority Of Milwaukee Coronavirus Cases Are Middle-Aged African- American Men Who May Have Thought They Weren’t At Risk, Officials Say

Milwaukee Coronavirus
Officials say most of Milwaukee coronavirus cases are middle-aged Black men who may have thought themselves immune since they had not traveled abroad. Photo by Fusion Medical Animation on Unsplash

Milwaukee, like other states in the U.S., has experienced an uptick in coronavirus cases. Officials say most of them are middle-aged Black men who may have thought themselves immune, reported the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

According to the report, Milwaukee stood at 158 confirmed cases Monday afternoon and the first three patients to die were black men in their 40s and 50s. They all had pre-existing conditions ranging from diabetes and hypertension to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and heart problems.

Yet many of those infected did not travel abroad. Health Commissioner Jeanette Kowalik said many of the people with positive tests probably thought “’I’m not going there,’ or ‘I don’t know anyone that goes there’ and ‘I’m not traveling, so I don’t have to worry about it.'”

Listen to GHOGH with Jamarlin Martin | Episode 69: Jamarlin Martin

Jamarlin goes solo to unpack the question: Was Barack Obama the first political anti-Christ to rise in Black America?

The city’s mayor, Tom Barrett, recently issued a stay at home order amid the pandemic.

“This is about something that’s here right now.” He added they were “”communicating as fast as we can and as deeply as we can into these neighborhoods to let people know that this is not just about people who had been in China,” Barrett said.


Are you interested in getting smart on Life Insurance?
No Doctor Visit Required, Get Policy for as low as $30 per Month
Click here to take the next step

Kowalik drew parallels between racist policies like redlining and segregation with where the coronavirus cases are concentrated. She also noted the lack of resources the city’s Black community have that make complying with certain mandates like social distancing more difficult.

“Looking at the maps of Milwaukee, and looking where people live, looking at the history of redlining and segregation and how that crosses over into today, when we’re talking about various health outcomes like infant mortality, childhood lead poisoning, you see very similar distributions,” Kowalik said.