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Big Out-Of-State Money Pours Into Georgia To Help Stacey Abrams Take Georgia Governorship

Big Out-Of-State Money Pours Into Georgia To Help Stacey Abrams Take Georgia Governorship

Stacey Abrams

This combination of 2022 and 2021 file photos shows Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp, left, and gubernatorial Democratic candidate Stacey Abrams. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

The Georgia gubernatorial rematch between Democrat darling Stacey Abrams and Republican incumbent Brian Kemp is one of the most high-profile in the country.

And it shows in the fundraising. Out-of-state donations have come in for each candidate but Abrams leads the two when it comes to out-of-state donors. In fact, most of her reported fundraising is from donors outside Georgia

According to a report by Axios, of the $49.6 million Abrams raised as of June 30, only $7 million, which is roughly 14 percent, came from her home state.

Kemp is the reverse. Of his $31.5 million raised, $26.2 million come from Georgians. This is nearly 84 percent of Kemp’s campaign fundraising.

The majority of Abrams’ donations have come from California followed by Washington D.C., New York and Delaware. Abrams also has a lot of unitemized donations from donors who gave less than $100, which means her in-state haul could be higher than reflected.

Stacey Abrams’ rising celebrity profile – as well as her work with Fair Fight being credited with helping flip Georgia from red to blue in the senate and presidential races – have garnered her more than three times the amount she raised when she ran against Kemp in 2018 and narrowly lost.

In 2019, Abrams came out in support of reparations for Black Americans and Native Americans during an interview with The Root.


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“I believe African Americans and Native Americans are entitled to reparations we are the two communities who were legally disenfranchised from the inception of this country and we are the two communities who had legal structures that were put in place for such a long period of time that our ability to achieve and access opportunity at a level that was commensurate with the rest of America was just not available,” Abrams said.

When asked what reparations should look like, Abrams said a collaborative group should decide.

“I think we have to have a conversation about what reparations should look like and that shouldn’t be the domain of a single person in part because I don’t know enough to know what the answer is,” Abrams answered. “This is a complex issue and anyone who would say that it’s simplistic is being disingenuous.”