Child Sex Abuse Is Rife In The Gambia’s ‘Pedo Paradise’, Where Tourists Buy Children And Toddlers To Rape

Kevin Mwanza
Written by Kevin Mwanza
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Child sex abuse is now tragically endemic in the Gambia, where 60 percent of the population lives below the poverty line. Image from Stijn Kleerebezem on Unsplash

Gambian children are being sold to pedophiles for as little as $3 by their desperate parents due to lax laws in the poverty-stricken African country.

Huge numbers of predators are taking advantage of these weak laws and the desperation of the children’s parents — abusing vulnerable children during vacations planned around the disgusting act.

They are targeting young boys and girls, according to an expose by The Sun.

There are fears that businesses will go bust and locals will go hungry following an estimated 50 percent drop in economic activity that has already hit the beach resorts, given that tourism makes up a third of the country’s GDP.

Child sex abuse is now tragically endemic in the Gambia, where 60 percent of the population lives below the poverty line.

Pedophiles often pose as charity workers and good samaritans so as to befriend poor families. The United Nations Children’s Fund warned that The Gambia is one of Africa’s top destinations for child sex tourism.

In 2013, the Gambian government introduced new laws allowing them to seize hotel properties if children are knowingly abused on the premises. They also pledged to give out hefty fines and stiff sentences to pedophiles that are caught.

However, there has only been one prosecution since the laws were tightened, and the man ended up being pardoned by the president.

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An investigation by the U.N. in October 2019 found that Gambia’s tourist areas continue to be a dangerous place for children and that predators and pedophiles now prefer to stay in private apartments and motels to avoid prying eyes.

The Independent Inquiry Into Child Sexual Abuse reported that more needs to be done to make sure offenders operating in poor countries like the Gambia are caught and prosecuted.