MSN And White America Demand Lebron James Bang Against China And Support Violent Protests In Hong Kong

Written by Staff
LeBron
LeBron James is being asked to take sides in the China-NBA rift over violent Hong Kong pro-democracy protests. He’s pictured here with Chinese players during a basketball event on Aug. 18, 2015 in Shanghai, China. (AP Photo)

Basketball great LeBron James has earned a reputation for his commitment to social justice issues, and now he’s been asked to take sides as a rift grows between China and the NBA over violent Hong Kong pro-democracy protests.

Nike does big business in China and James is Nike’s highest-paid and most globally recognized pitchman. In the most recent quarter, Nike’s China revenue increased by 22 percent to almost $1.7 billion, The Wall Street Journal reported.

James has a reputation off the court for his commitment to social justice issues, Josh Peter wrote in a USA Today editorial. “Now’s the time to chop it up again,” Peters wrote. “Oppression in Hong Kong is an issue that deserves LeBron’s considered view.”

If James wants to preserve his well-deserved reputation as an athlete willing to risk backlash while speaking out against social injustice, he must show that he supports the right to free speech and believes in a free and open society, Peters wrote. “Anything less will leave LeBron looking like a sellout.”

LeBron James social justice causes

Peters listed some social justice issues James has supported including the following:

  • He supported Colin Kaepernick’s protest against racism and police brutality, once telling the Los Angeles Times, “I think with Kap, I stand with Kap, I kneel with Kap.”
  • He criticized Donald Trump for divisive politics and saying, “We’re not gonna let … one individual no matter the power, no matter the impact that he should have or she should have, ever use sports as a platform to divide us.”
  • He wore a hooded sweatshirt in 2012 after Trayvon Martin was shot to death by a white neighborhood crime-watch volunteer.
  • He spoke out against hate in the U.S. before the start of the 2017 NBA Finals after a gate outside his home was vandalized with the N-word.

China’s state broadcaster canceled plans to show a pair of preseason games there later this week after Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey tweeted support for anti-government protesters in Hong Kong, KTLA reported.

The tweet was deleted, but NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said the league is not apologizing for the tweet. In a statement, Silver said he supports Morey’s right of freedom of speech, and the NBA will not regulate what players, employees and team owners say.

CCTV said it won’t show the games between the Los Angeles Lakers and Brooklyn Nets, scheduled to play Thursday in Shanghai and Saturday in Shenzhen. Basketball is very popular in China and those two teams would have been a huge TV draw — mainly because of James starring for the Lakers and Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba’s co-founder Joe Tsai now owning the Nets.

Listen to GHOGH with Jamarlin Martin | Episode 67: Jamarlin Martin

Jamarlin goes solo to discuss the NFL’s entertainment and “social justice” deal with Jay-Z. We look back at the Barclays gentrification issue in the documentary “A Genius Leaves The Hood: The Unauthorized Story of Jay-Z.”

“We’re strongly dissatisfied and oppose Adam Silver’s claim to support Morey’s right to freedom of expression,” CCTV said in a statement. “We believe that any remarks that challenge national sovereignty and social stability are not within the scope of freedom of speech.”

Basketball is one of the most popular sports in China. More than 300 million people play recreationally and half a billion watched at least one match last season. The Houston Rockets are one of the biggest NBA brands in China, mainly because Hall of Famer Yao Ming spent his NBA career there, U.K.’s Express reported.

Some NBA fans want the NBA to pull the Lakers and Nets from playing their two preseason games in China. One fan tweeted: “Please cancel the China games and get lakers back to America ASAP.”