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Lizzo back in fans’ good graces with Billboard cover after shaming Postmates driver

Lizzo back in fans’ good graces with Billboard cover after shaming Postmates driver

Lizzo performs in concert during her “Cuz I Love You Too Tour” at The Met on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019, in Philadelphia. (Photo by Owen Sweeney/Invision/AP)

Three days ago, Lizzo, 31, was apologizing for going too far with her petty, now she’s being celebrated for her unique personality, tenacity and Billboard cover.

After coming under fire for putting a Postmates driver on blast and accusing her of stealing her food on Twitter, the “Truth Hurts” artist apologized. Then, in typical Lizzo fashion, she broke the internet with her positive attitude and charisma.

In her feature with Billboard, Lizzo revealed how she kept pushing after she released “Truth Hurts” two years ago, despite the fact that it didn’t initially do well.

“I’ve always had to turn haters into congratulators,” Lizzo told Billboard. “That’s the thing with my songs and my live shows: I’ve never lost that mentality of ‘I have to win you over,’ and I’m never going to, because I didn’t learn that way. I have muscle memory in this.”

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The self-love ambassador said she had to find out who she was and be comfortable enough to completely own it.

“I think my story has been more about refining who I am versus creating it,” Lizzo said. “When I wrote songs like ‘My Skin’ or ‘En Love,’ that was like, ‘Oh, sh*t, I found it. I’m starting to discover who I am.’”

She also spoke about the contributions Black women have always made to pop, saying “Black women have always defined pop … We just were never really given the platform or the credit.”

The Billboard feature underscores the core of who Lizzo is – and the reason Prince endorsed his fellow Minneapolis artist.

Everyone is entitled to a lapse in judgment. Lizzo had hers, then she apologized. Then Billboard reminded everyone why she’ll likely rake in Grammy-nominations for being the talented, encouraging artist she is.